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Butter is like Bacon . . . It makes Everything Taste Better

Peggy said, “Twelve.” We were at a movie theater. We had just placed an order at the refreshment stand. I looked at her and said, “What?” “The attendant just counted twelve squirts,” she said. I stopped day dreaming and looked at the attendant who was still squirting butter onto my popcorn. I said, “That’s good.” I took the container with both hands. I don’t recall walking to my seat. The warm smell of butter and salt filled my nose . . . my lungs . . . and my head. I don’t remember the movie, but I remember the butter . . . and the popcorn. Actually it was more like popcorn floating in butter soup. After I ate all of the popcorn I still licked my fingers, and yet . . . I threw the rest away.

The warm smell of butter and salt filled my nose . . . my lungs . . . and my head.

When I was a child I remember clear bags of white margarine. There was an orange-ish red dot of coloring that we had to massage until the oleo took on a strange looking color. I don’t recall liking it. Now, butter on the other hand was something else. My mother grew up in the mid-west. She would cook a steak until it was black and dry and then put a pat of butter on it to give it some moisture and taste. There is nothing like steak butter.

Corn on the cob was an excuse to get a pat of butter into my mouth while taking a bite of corn.

Even when the butter scare was going on I still ate butter, but now that professionals know that butter is a good thing, I still eat butter. I just don’t eat a lot of it. I like the saltiness, the coolness, and the flavor. Corn on the cob was an excuse to get a pat of butter into my mouth while taking a bite of corn. I also like fried potatoes with a little butter on them when served. Mashed potatoes are worthless without a little pool of melted butter to attract a large spoon. Although I talk a lot about butter, like the Greeks I believe in moderation. Corn on the cob is limited to a few times in the summer, generally BBQs on the deck. For my current view on butter, I like to rub an ear of corn with a lime wedge, add a little sea salt, grind some course ground pepper over the ear and then rub a cold cube of butter along the kernels before placing the ears on the grill. Then I generally don’t add any more butter. Fried potatoes are served a little more regularly, but then I use two or three small baby reds or Yukon Golds. Mashed potatoes and butter in our house is rare, usually just Thanksgiving and Easter.

I still order buttered popcorn, however. I love the Grand Cinema, where they still actually use melted butter on their popcorn . . . but I only get the small member bag of popcorn.

Good toothy bread IS an occasion of sin.

Good toothy bread IS an occasion of sin. But with the price of a good loaf of bread in the five dollar plus range, we buy good bread only a couple of times a quarter. I sometimes think that Heaven is a bakery with rustic breads and enough butter to last.

“Despite having been demonized in the past, butter (especially from grass-fed cows) is actually pretty healthy. That being said, there is no reason to go out of your way to eat more of it.
Butter in small amounts is fine, but it may cause problems if you eat way too much (for example, by adding a few tablespoons to your morning coffee). Plus, it is not as healthy as extra virgin olive oil, which is the world’s healthiest fat.” – www.healthline.com/nutrition/7-reasons-why-butter-is-good-for-you

Recently we found a great deal on Finlandia Spreadable butter; comes from small family farms in Finland.

We mostly use spreadable butter these days unless we have guests over or it’s holiday time. Then we offer both spreadable butter and regular cubed butter. We like Land O’ Lakes spreadable butter . . . made with olive oil if we can find it or canola oil. Recently we found a great deal on Finlandia Spreadable butter; comes from small family farms in Finland. $1.99 for 15 ounces. We don’t freeze butter, so we probably just have enough for several months.

I do sometimes sing a folk tune . . . to ease me off to dreamland . . . “Butter, I remember butter . . . we were just like lovers . . . we were quite a team.” – Megon McDonough, founding member of Four Bitchin’ Babes

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