Before The Fall

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By Dorothy Wilhelm

UNIVERSITY PLACE – I had just taken this picture (see below) of the “Love Locks” a day or so before the cable broke or was broken at Chambers Bay in University Place. I was curious about what they could possibly mean, and my kids naturally – kids are so smart – were able to tell me that in “locking their love” and throwing away the key, it was a symbol that love would last forever.

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Around the Sound: Spring around the area

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All this heavy rain means that Winter is putting up a fight. But signs of spring are visible: from the delicate crocuses popping up on the grounds of the Old Settler’s Cemetery in Lakewood, to the tiny pink blossoms on the flowering plum at the Towne Center; snowdrops and jonquils lining the gateway at Lakewold Gardens and lots of camellia blossoms budding up around the lake.

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Ah, spring…one of these days!

 

CPSD: Images from Carter Lake, Hillside dedication

Attendees

The Clover Park School District dedicated Carter Lake and Hillside Elementary schools on Wednesday, October 16. Both schools are on Joint Base Lewis-McChord. The event to honor both schools took place at Carter Lake Elementary School. Thanks to Gary Sabol for the pictures.

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Around the Sound: Fall Crocus

FallCrocus

FallCrocus

By Nancy Covert 

Hidden away near the Bell Monument in Steilacoom are these regal-looking crocuses; normally a sign of spring, they also appear in autumn, and winter. Crocuses are native to woodland, scrub, and meadows from sea level to alpine tundra in central and southern Europe, North Africa and the Middle East, on the islands of the Aegean, and across Central Asia to western China.

Knotweed isn’t a good shrub

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By Nancy Henderson

Most people are familiar with the invasive plant Scotch Broom, but fewer know about knotweed, a much more-threatening species.

Knotweed is very aggressive, escaped ornamental that is capable of forming dense stands, crowding out all other vegetation and degrading wildlife habitat.  These aggressive invasive plants grow better in their new habitat due to the absence of native predators and diseases that limit their growth in their native Asia.

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